green paper

noun
a preliminary report of government proposals that is published in order to stimulate discussion
Hypernyms: ↑report, ↑study, ↑written report

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noun
Usage: often capitalized G&P
Britain : a government document that discusses proposed approaches to a problem

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Brit.
a report presenting the policy proposals of the government, to be discussed in Parliament.
[1945-50; appar. so called from the color of the paper on which they are printed]

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green paper noun
(often with caps) a statement of proposed government policy, intended as a basis for parliamentary discussion
• • •
Main Entry:green

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Green Paper UK US noun [countable] [singular Green Paper plural Green Papers]
a document published by the government of the UK or Canada that gives details of proposals so that they can be discussed before new laws are made
Thesaurus: documents and types of documenthyponym parts of pieces of writingmeronym

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Green Paper,
British. a government document in which a proposal or idea is put up for discussion, usually printed on green paper to distinguish it from a white paper, which presents fixed policy.

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noun, pl ⋯ -pers [count]
Brit : a government document that suggests solutions to a problem and that is intended to cause discussion before a law is made — compare

WHITE PAPER

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ˌGreen ˈPaper [Green Paper] noun
(in Britain) a document containing government proposals on a particular subject, intended for general discussion

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • green paper — UK US noun [C] GOVERNMENT, LAW ► a document published by a government containing information about a possible new law or changes to an existing law, in order to start a public discussion: »The group criticises the government s green paper for… …   Financial and business terms

  • green paper — n a document produced by the British government containing proposals to be discussed, which may later be used in making laws →↑white paper, bill ↑bill …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Green Paper — Green Papers N COUNT In Britain, a Green Paper is a document containing ideas about a particular subject that is published by the Government so that people can discuss them before any decisions are made …   English dictionary

  • Green Paper — A working document published by the UK government and intended to be a platform for discussion. Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. www.practicallaw.com. 2010 …   Law dictionary

  • Green Paper — noun count MAINLY BRITISH a document published by the government of the U.K. or Canada that gives details of proposals so that they can be discussed before new laws are made …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Green paper — See also: White paper and Blue book In the Commonwealth, the Republic of Ireland and the United States[1] a green paper is a tentative government report of a proposal without any commitment to action; the first step in changing the law.… …   Wikipedia

  • Green Paper —    A tentative statement of governmental thinking on the issues raised by some issue of public policy. Such a paper often sets out alternative means of resolving a problem and invites consultation and discussion of the available options. A Green… …   Glossary of UK Government and Politics

  • Green Paper — UK / US noun [countable] Word forms Green Paper : singular Green Paper plural Green Papers a document published by the government of the UK or Canada that gives details of proposals so that they can be discussed before new laws are made …   English dictionary

  • Green Paper — Green′ Pa per n. brit. and can. a report presenting the policy proposals of the government, to be discussed in Parliament • Etymology: 1945–50 …   From formal English to slang

  • green paper — /ˈgrin peɪpə/ (say green paypuh) noun Chiefly British a paper which proposes policy in a given area, issued by government not as a declaration of intent but as a basis for public discussion. Compare white paper (def. 2) …   Australian English dictionary

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